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Archive for October, 2009|Monthly archive page

Black Void at the Tate Modern

In Uncategorized on October 16, 2009 at 4:39 pm

London’s Tate Modern has unveiled Miroslaw Balka’s “How It Is,” a sculpture that may frighten visitors who are afraid of the dark. To view the sculpture in its intirety, museum visitors walk up a ramp to the ominous steel chamber. Upon entering the sculpture, guests will enter a black void. Balka’s installation has created some health and safety concerns for the museum, and Tate Modern guards will regularly control the structure with lighted torches.

Balka's "How It Is"

Balka's "How It Is"

The artist’s work has various connotations, alluding to the biblical Plague of Darkness, black holes in space and images of hell. Likewise, those who view (and enter) the sculpture will have different reactions.

As Balka States in an article from the Guardian, “Each one of us will approach this work and experience it very differently,” she said. “For some it may be an incredibly sombre experience, for most it will be unnerving. For others there will be something quite comforting about going into a space like this full of strangers, yet being aware of each other.”

Balka has been working on the piece, from concept to installation, for a year. Asked what his first reaction on walking into the completed container was, he said: “Whoa. It works.”

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Bad Taste

In Uncategorized on October 1, 2009 at 3:54 pm

Ausgestopftes Meerschweinchen auf Rollbrett. Entwurf: Andi Domke, Schweiz, 2009.
An interesting show opened on July 16 (and will be up until January 11, 2010) at the Museum der Dinge in Berlin.  Evil Things. An Encyclopedia of Bad Taste “uses a one hundred year-old system to categorise violations of taste, where things are not just submitted to a judgement of taste, but also to ethical valuation of their production, construction and appearance.  Today’s judgement is not just based on aesthetic but also on moral values, when categories of “good” and “bad” (or evil) are applied. The exhibition will juxtapose historic “home horrors” to contemporary design objects and mass production. Thus a situation will be created, that raises questions about our system of values of things”.

ArtDaily.com examines the exhibition’s origins through the eyes of Gustav E. Pazaurek, art historian and museum director who opened his original “Cabinet of Bad Taste” in 1909.  Read the article here.

useone hundred year-old system to categorise violations of taste, where things are not just submitted to a judgement of taste, but also to ethical valuation of their production, construction and appearance.
Today’s judgement is not just based on aesthetic but also on moral values, when categories of “good” and “bad” (or evil) are applied. The exhibition will juxtapose historic “home horrors” to contemporary design objects and mass production. Thus a situation will be created, that raises questions about our system of values of thingsuses a one hundred year-old system to categorise violations of taste, where things are not just submitted to a judgement of taste, but also to ethical valuation of their production, construction and appearance.  Today’s judgement is not just based on aesthetic but also on moral values, when categories of “good” and “bad” (or evil) are applied. The exhibition will juxtapose historic “home horrors” to contemporary design objects and mass production. Thus a situation will be created, that raises questions about our system of values of things